Journalist Section

Nigeria ranked 7th among countries facing shortage of health workers

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Nigeria is ranked 7th among 57 countries classified as facing a critical shortage of health workers, it was learnt Tuesday
.
According to the Minister of Health, Prof Isaac Adewole the country has a shortage of 144,000 health workers.  Nigeria is ranked second in Africa behind Ethiopia with 152,000.
 
Presently, the country boasts of 240,000 nurses and midwives and by 2030 the country will be needing 149,852 doctors and 471,353 nurses and midwives.
 

Nurses, midwives decry poor state of Nigeria’s health facilities

Sunday, May 7, 2017

The President of the National Association of Nigeria Nurses and Midwives (NANNM), Abdulrafiu Adeniji has decried the poor state of health facilities in the country, arguing it has made midwives not to perform optimally on their jobs.
 
He therefore called for a stronger health system and well-equipped facilities that make healthcare accessible, especially those in rural communities.
 

Niger Gov Warns Officials Against Playing Politics With Healthcare

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Miffed by the refusal of some government agencies to effectively distribute drugs to health centres, Niger State Governor, Alhaji Abubakar Sani Bello has warned his appointees against playing politics with what has direct bearing with the lives of the people.
 

The governor  in continuation of his midterm assessment tour yesterday to Baddegi in Katcha local government area , expressed dissatisfaction with what he met on ground at Hajiya Mumbai Aliyu maternal and child health center in the town.
 

Editorial NMA’s strategic five-year plan

Friday, April 28, 2017

The Nigeria Medical Association (NMA) recently launched a five-year strategic plan to improve this country’s health sector. The plan, launched on Tuesday April 18, 2007 brought together civil society organizations and other medical associations to parley and advance the sector. Among those at the meeting to finalize the NMA Strategic Plan 2017-2022 were development partners.
 

Condoms vs Conservatives: The problems of family planning in Nigeria

Thursday, April 20, 2017

NOT everyone thinks birth control is a blessing. Boko Haram, a jihadist group that terrorises north-eastern Nigeria, deems artificial contraception to be a product of infidel learning, and therefore forbidden. Its ideologues also believe that females should avoid school, marry early (sometimes while still children) and have lots of babies. In the dwindling areas the jihadists control, women have no choice.
 

After maternal health issues, mums bear smiles

LEFT: Asmau Suleiman being taken into the operating room in this specially constructed wheelchair RIGHT: Radiya being treated for pre-eclampsia. PHOTOS: Adie Vanessa Offiong
Sunday, April 23, 2017

Aisha Suleiman, 32, had just been delivered of her seventh child. She has a history of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) where she suffers uncontrolled bleeding after each of her pregnancies. This time, it took three pints of blood to stabilise her.
 

CAN, FOMWAN Partner On Child, Family Health

Saturday, March 4, 2017

In its effort to bring healthcare awareness to the grassroots, Federation of Muslim Women's Association in Nigeria (FOMWAN), has partnered with the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), and religious leaders of the Muslim community on issues of child and family health.
 

58,000 women dying every year is "social injustice", says Ladipo

Friday, March 3, 2017

President of the Association for Reproductive and Family Health, Professor Oladapo Ladipo says the number of women dying from pregnancy and childbirth complications every year in Nigeria is "one of the greatest injustices of our time."
 
"It is shameful that Nigeria still contributes significantly to global maternal death figure. We estimate that we are losing about 58,000 mothers annually, through pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum complications," Ladipo said.
 

KATAMPE: FCT VILLAGE WHERE WOMEN GIVE BIRTH AT HOME

Friday, March 3, 2017

Imagine, the traumatic torture of pregnant women who daily see, hear of the deaths of a fellow pregnant women dying from complications relating to pregnancy and child births.

 

 

Unfortunately, Nigeria with over 160 million people contributes 10 percent of the world annual maternal death. The figure stands at 52,000 deaths per annum from complications relating to pregnancy and child births, this is alarming.

 

 

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