Media Partnership for Maternal Halth Accountability News

SPECIAL REPORT: Why preventable Neonatal Tetanus continues to kill newborns in Nigeria

Sunday, September 16, 2018

When Mama Adekunle, as she is fondly called, heard the news of the birth of a child to her son, she did what most new grandmothers in Nigeria do – she rushed over to perform her traditional duty of taking care of the new mother and child.
This duty includes passing knowledge to the new mother on how to bathe the child and take care of its umbilical cord.
According to Mama, the umbilical cord needs to heal properly, to avoid stomach pain for the child.

Nigeria’s booming abortion black market

Sunday, September 9, 2018

The price of abortion in Nigeria ranges from N250 to a woman’s life.

Although they are officially sold in Nigeria for the prevention and treatment of post-delivery bleeding, abortion drugs are increasingly getting popular and their potential implications are far-reaching, pitching the country’s hard stance on abortion against the stark reality doctors and healthcare providers daily contend with at their clinics. 

The Trouble With Maternal Healthcare In Nigeria

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Having lost two children to avoidable ailments at birth, Maria escaped from her rural community to Lagos to seek a better delivery opportunity for her child. At 32, Maria cannot afford to feed three times a day let alone, her baby. With her family’s income below N1,000 a day, their feeding and paying rent is arduous. Paying a medical bill they consider outrageous is a lot more difficult. This leaves Maria at the mercy of the hospital, waiting to be sent off when the hospital management tires.
Maria’s grimy case is not peculiar.

The Trouble With Maternal Healthcare In Nigeria

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Maria has been in a popular hospital for three weeks since the delivery of her twins. She says her husband ran away after he found out she was pregnant. Despite the cheap cost of the medical bills, Maria cannot afford to cover her bills. Since then, doctors, whose profession is characterised by owed salaries, have been attending to her needs and that of her child out of goodwill.
Read more: https://guardian.ng/life/on-the-cover/the-trouble-with-maternal-healthca...

Zamfara renovates 147 primary health care in rural areas

Friday, July 27, 2018

Lawal Muhammad Liman made the disclosure in Gusau at the opening ceremony of the 5th annual General Meeting and Scientific Conference of the Nigeria Medical Association (NMA), Zamfara state chapter.

 

Liman who was represented by the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry Dr Habibu Yelwa said one of the top most priority of the governor Abdul’Aziz Yari Abubakar led administration is to make health care available and affordable to the people.

New NGO In Northern Nigeria Pledges To Help Address Maternal Deaths

Monday, July 23, 2018

 newly floated non-governmental organisation, Amana Hope and Care Initiative’ (AHCI), says it is poised to help address the plight of vulnerable women and children, as well as maternal health in northern Nigeria.
“This has prompted me to establish AHCI, to contribute my quota and support ongoing effort in addressing these challenges,” founder and Chairperson of the Organization, Farida Abubakar said, while inaugurating the Board of Trustees in Kaduna, northern Nigeria.

Raising immunity in northern Nigeria

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

In hard-to-reach communities, a Canada-funded project is opening up access to health.
Three-year-old Ibrahim wouldn’t stop crying. Suffering from ringworm, a fungal infection, his leg had become badly infected. Left untreated, he risked developing fever and scarring wounds.
For Ali Musa, his father, it was hard to know where to turn for help. Where he lives, in the nomadic community of Daurawa Shazagi in the Nigerian state of Jigawa, there is little access to professional medical treatment.

Nigeria fights high maternal mortality through improved quality of care

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

“There were no signs that the morning of 31 May 2018 would be different until I started feeling the pangs, requiring medical assistance,” said Naomi Muyadeen. "Initially, I dreaded going to the government facility but stepping into the health facility, I immediately noticed the change.”
A resident of Kuchingoro, a suburb of Abuja, Mrs Muyadeen is a 23 year old mother of one and nine months pregnant. She has had previous antenatal visits to the Primary Healthcare Centre (PHC) in Kuchingoro.
 

Pages