Civil Societies Organisation News

The Trouble With Maternal Healthcare In Nigeria

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Maria has been in a popular hospital for three weeks since the delivery of her twins. She says her husband ran away after he found out she was pregnant. Despite the cheap cost of the medical bills, Maria cannot afford to cover her bills. Since then, doctors, whose profession is characterised by owed salaries, have been attending to her needs and that of her child out of goodwill.
Read more: https://guardian.ng/life/on-the-cover/the-trouble-with-maternal-healthca...

Zamfara renovates 147 primary health care in rural areas

Friday, July 27, 2018

Lawal Muhammad Liman made the disclosure in Gusau at the opening ceremony of the 5th annual General Meeting and Scientific Conference of the Nigeria Medical Association (NMA), Zamfara state chapter.

 

Liman who was represented by the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry Dr Habibu Yelwa said one of the top most priority of the governor Abdul’Aziz Yari Abubakar led administration is to make health care available and affordable to the people.

Nigeria fights high maternal mortality through improved quality of care

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

“There were no signs that the morning of 31 May 2018 would be different until I started feeling the pangs, requiring medical assistance,” said Naomi Muyadeen. "Initially, I dreaded going to the government facility but stepping into the health facility, I immediately noticed the change.”
A resident of Kuchingoro, a suburb of Abuja, Mrs Muyadeen is a 23 year old mother of one and nine months pregnant. She has had previous antenatal visits to the Primary Healthcare Centre (PHC) in Kuchingoro.
 

Obstetric Fistula: Why expectant mothers must register with skilled birth attendant

Monday, May 28, 2018

With about 500,000 Nigerian women living with obstetric fistula, women need to avail themselves with regular medical check up to prevent health complications, including fistula, which could lead to death of mothers.
As Nigeria, 0n May 23,joined the rest of the world to commemorate the World Fistula day, experts say there is a need for collective action to get appropriate treatment to avoid the needless debilitating conditions and death that could result from pregnancy and childbirth complications in the country.

Health DEVCOM seeks end to fistula as 148,000 women await surgery

Thursday, May 31, 2018

However, some of the VVF centers in the country do not have enough beds or adequate electricity to carry out necessary surgery.
To this end, both the Federal and state governments need to increase the funding allocated to the health sector and implement provisions of various policies to address the needs of women and children, said Akin Jimoh, Programme Director, Development Communications Network (DEVCOM).

End Obstetric Fistula, save women’s lives

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

With about 500,000 Nigerian women living with obstetric fistula, women need to avail themselves with regular medical check up to prevent health complications, including fistula, that could lead to death of mothers.  As Nigeria commemorates the World Fistula day today there is a need for collective action to get appropriate treatment to avoid the needless debilitating conditions and death that could result from pregnancy and childbirth complications in the country.

World Midwife Day: Association seeks employment of more professional midwives

Friday, May 4, 2018

Association of Nigerian Nurses and Midwives (NANNM-Midwives) has pleaded with the Federal Government to employ more professionally-trained midwives as the world marks the International Day of Midwife.
The International Day of Midwife (IDM) is commemorated on May 5 annually and theme for the year is “Midwives leading the way with quality care”.
Margret Akinsola, the Chairman NANNM-Midwives said such step would check the rate of maternal, newborn and infant deaths in Nigeria.
 

#Inthenews: How unplanned births leave Nigerian women on the brink of death

Thursday, April 19, 2018

While it is worrisome that many women in Nigeria become pregnant almost every year, what is more disturbing is the fact they carry these pregnancies between life and death – battling with one pregnancy-induced ailment or the other. Correspondent Marcus Fatunmole in this special report presents women who have to contend with different health issues in Abuja, following their failure to rest in-between pregnancies.

SPECIAL REPORT: Women in Abuja communities abandon clinics, rely on traditional birth attendants for delivery

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Asabe Joshua resides in Igu, a suburb of Abuja, Nigeria’s Federal Capital Territory. Located about 15 kilometres from Bwari town of Bwari Local Government Area, the community is as rural as you are likely to find in many other parts of Africa’s largest economy.
A public primary health care centre is located in the village but it could just as well not have been there.
“I delivered my children through Mama (a traditional birth attendant (TBA),” Mrs Joshua, a mother of two, told this reporter.

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